Visitatori salutem!

In the fall of 2013 over a third of all the published magical gems can be consulted in the Campbell Bonner Magical Gems Database: this means more than 1100 objects and forty collections. The search menu has also been renewed. Multiple search fields allow users to make more sophisticated queries, while the new My CBd Service, freely available for all registered users, enables one to tag gems, create personal collections and take notes within the database. It is a great pleasure to receive more and more addenda and corrigenda from fellow scholars, which shows that CBd is slowly beginning to play the role we dreamed for it and has become a research tool in classical studies.

πᾶσαν χάριν καὶ πρᾶξιν,

Árpád M. Nagy
Budapest, September 2013


By the end of 2012, with over nine-hundred gems present and more than thirty collections represented in the database, a fourth of the known corpus of magical gems has become accessible, while we are presently working on the upload of a similar amount. As the integration of new material naturally necessitates changes, having got this far, we have started to reconsider certain features of the database, to review what has been achieved until now and launch improvements in order to create not simply a corpus of magical gems, but also a research tool. 
Our research on magical gems worldwide has been made possible by the ongoing support of Vacheron Constantin, Geneva. A standard grant of the International Visegrad Fund has allowed us to concentrate on ’Magical Gems in the Visegrad Countries’.

πᾶσαν χάριν καὶ πρᾶξιν,

Árpád M. Nagy
Budapest, January 2013


The database has reached the next phase in its development: we have begun preparations for the electronic re-edition of Campbell Bonner’s fundamental Studies on Magical Gems. Chiefly Graeco-Egyptian. Members of the editorial board are: Véronique Dasen (University Fribourg), Chris Faraone (University Chicago) and Árpád M. Nagy (Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest).
The database continues to be enlarged jointly by the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest and University Fribourg.

πσαν χάριν κα πρξιν,

Árpád M. Nagy

Budapest, March 2012


We are pleased to make public the enlarged version of the Campbell Bonner database (CBd). The new database has been greatly developed compared to the previous version, though further improvements will still be necessary for it to fulfil its task and become a repository of knowledge on magical gems and related objects, a kind of editio minor continua.
The database in its present form contains the documentation of magical gems from collections in Switzerland, the United States, Hungary and the superb collection of the British Museum. The database has been created through the generous support of an unnamed Hungarian patron, the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA), the Museum of Fine Arts (Budapest), la Maison Vacheron Constantin (Geneva).
Members of the advisory board supervising the development of the database: Véronique Dasen (University Fribourg), Simone Michel-von Dungern (Museum Marktbreit), Erika Zwierlein-Diehl (University Bonn), Chris A. Faraone (University Chicago), Richard Gordon (University Erfurt), Attilio Mastrocinque (University Verona), Árpád M. Nagy (Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest).
Characteres will be described by Kirsten Dzwiza (Heidelberg) in an independent project within the framework of the database.
A unified description of the material and colour of the gems can only be given through an international co-operation. The future of such a scholarly enterprise depends on a close collaboration of experts and museums all around the world. The next step is to collect magical gems locally, with the hope of these individual initiatives in the countries in possession of major collections converging one day into a unique and universal research tool that scholars and students of ancient magic will find useful.

πσαν χάριν κα πρξιν,

Árpád M. Nagy
Budapest, August 2011


The original version of this database was developed by the Classical Collection in the Budapest Museum of Fine Arts - this and the group of softwares it uses were adapted for our present purpose. This database, hopefully, can serve as a starting point for two purposes: in the first place, for a future closed-access research database that incorporates all the magical gems and would be a result of a large-scale, joint project, a sort of Corpus Gemmarum Magicarum, that would be possible to carry out and develop only in close international collaboration and mutual support. Secondly, thanks to its IT requirements, it could be connected to various other databases on the field of ancient magic.

πσαν χάριν κα πρξιν,

Árpád M. Nagy
Budapest, June 2010